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nybrother
08-31-2008, 12:01 AM
بسم الله، الحمد لله، والصلاة والسلام على رسول الله وبعد

Assalamu 'alaikum warahmatullahi wabarakatuh,

In the Qur'an, Allah 'azza wa jall uses the word "a'yun" which is the plural form of the Arabic word for "eye" which is " 'ayn".

What is the correct Ahl al-Sunnah position on the Eyes of Allah subhaanahu wa ta'aala?

Do we affirm that Allah has "a'yun" fullstop? Or do we affirm Two Eyes for Allah?

JazakAllahu khairun

muhsinmuttaqi
08-31-2008, 05:15 PM
Assalamu Alaykum wa Rahmatullahee wa Barakatu

We by default go by the literal meaning, unless there is an evidence otherwise. But without trying to think about the howness. We listen and obey and we listen and believe and we listen an accept. If Allah subhanahu wa ta'ala tells us the He has two eyes or two hands, then we listen and accept.

Waleed Basyouni
08-31-2008, 08:34 PM
Ahlus-Sunnah wal Jamaa'ah believe that Allaah has two eyes that befit His Majesty. As with all of Allaah's attributes, they should not be imagined or compared to those of His creation.

Ibn Taymiyyah mentioned the consensus of AhlusSunnah on this issue. Also, Abul-Hasan Al-Ash'aree, Ibn Khuzaymah, and Al-Baaqillaani all mentioned this Ijmaa'.

The proof for this is the hadeeth which was reported by Muslim, in which the Prophet (SAS) describes the false Messiah as being one-eyed, when Allaah is not. Linguistically, that necessitates that Allaah has two eyes, because having two eyes is the opposite of having one. In one narration it is mentioed that the Prophet (SAS) also pointed to his eyes.



Further evidence is in the hadeeth mentioned in Mukhtasar-us-Sawaa'iq of Ibnul Qayyim: "When the slave stands in Prayer, he stands between the Two Eyes of ar- Rahmaan." Reported by Ibn Hibbaan and Al-'Uqaylee, and the isnaad's strength is debatable.

Abu Daawood and Ibn Khuzaymah report that the Prophet (SAS) recited the verse "Verily, Allaah is the All-Hearing, All-Seeing" and he pointed to his eyes and ears.


In the Qur'aan, the eyes of Allaah were mentioned in singular and plural form. See (20:39), (11:37), (23:27), (52:48), and (54:14). The singluar form in Arabic typically refers to one and the plural form is used to mean 3+. However, the singular and plural forms can both be used in metaphrical terms and often the precise number/quantity is not meant. When one says he has a hand over someone in Arabic, hand is referring to a favor... but this expression can also be used to refer to one having multiple favors over someone. The same applies to the Arabic statement "I have hands over you", which could also refer to multiple favors, or a single one.



The rule is different for dual form. You cannot say I have 'yadaan' over you, or two hands over you. Since it is in the dual form, it cannot be used in a metaphorical sense in this case. Also, in any dual form, the duality is always meant specifically. Muthanaa always refers to two.



So, since we have the word 'eyes' appearing in texts in the singular, dual, and plural, we know to take the dual as referring to the specific number, and the singular and plural as referring only to the attribute, not a precise number.



The same applies to Allaah's hands, which have been mentioned in the singular, dual, and plural.

If you are interested to read more about this, you will find an excellent explanation in Ibn Taymiyyah's books, Ar-Risaalah At-Tadmuriyyah (Under Principle 4) and Ar-Risaalah Al-Madaniyyah.

This issue is a delicate one. I have seen some students of knowledge who acknowledge that Allaah has eyes, but refuse to specify them as being two in number due to the lack of clear, authentic evidence. I disagree with this opinion, but one should not consider this as a principle matter in 'Aqeedah or regard those who have a different opinion in it as innovators, or outside Ahlus-Sunnah.

Agamea
09-01-2008, 06:00 AM
Masha'Allah, Jazakallahu khair Shaykh Waleed.

nybrother
09-02-2008, 01:58 AM
JazakAllahu khairan Ustaadh...
This has cleared up some confusion which I have had for a while. Wa lillahi al-hamd.

JayshAllah
09-05-2008, 05:03 AM
Jazakh-Allah Khair, Shaykh Waleed. Excellent explanation.

layman
09-14-2008, 06:21 PM
Assalamu alaykum,

I have a question regarding people who deny Allah has eyes, hands, face, etc. Are they still considered muslims, but innovators or are they considered as people who left the fold of islam? I was listening to a lecture by Muhammad al-Ninowy and he said that anyone who says Allah has
these attributes that 'befit his majesty' is likening the creator to the creation and are kuffar. So since he and the other Asharee would consider me (as well as Allah since Allah says he has these attributes) a kaffir, should we also consider them as kuffar?

Sr.Sara
11-26-2008, 09:19 PM
Assalamu alaykum,

I have a question regarding people who deny Allah has eyes, hands, face, etc. Are they still considered muslims, but innovators or are they considered as people who left the fold of islam? I was listening to a lecture by Muhammad al-Ninowy and he said that anyone who says Allah has
these attributes that 'befit his majesty' is likening the creator to the creation and are kuffar. So since he and the other Asharee would consider me (as well as Allah since Allah says he has these attributes) a kaffir, should we also consider them as kuffar?

Did you take Light Upon Light?
That class answered this question (among others).

Abu_Hamza
12-22-2008, 01:17 AM
Dear respected Shaykh,

Assalamu alaykum. You said:

The proof for this is the hadeeth which was reported by Muslim, in which the Prophet (SAS) describes the false Messiah as being one-eyed, when Allaah is not. Linguistically, that necessitates that Allaah has two eyes, because having two eyes is the opposite of having one.
Can you please explain this a bit further? How is two the opposite of one? In other words, how does negation of being one-eyed necessitate having two eyes? Why not three, four, five or ten?

I understand that having two eyes is the opposite of being one-eyed for human beings, but we cannot assume that for Allah (swt).

So how is this hadith proof for establishing two eyes for Allah (awj)?

Jazak Allahu khayran

mytemuslim
12-23-2008, 05:59 PM
As salaamu alaikum,
Read the rest of the response and you will find that the shaykh (hafidullah) did explain himself clearly inshaAllah. He spoke about the various rules in the language and then explained that the eyes of Allah have been mentioned in numerous forms.

Abu_Hamza
12-24-2008, 12:30 AM
Assalamu alaykum,

mytemuslim, I read the entire post of the Shaykh, of course, before posting my previous reply. After reading your post, however, I read it once again. The rest of the Shaykh's post is not related to the hadith in question. He is reconciling between the singular and plural forms used in the Qur'an for "eyes" with the opinion that Allah has two eyes. That does not answer my question.

My question, once again, is:

Why does negation of one-eyedness necessitate two eyes? Why not three, four or more?

This question is important, because this is the only authentic text that is allegedly explicit in its attribution of two eyes to Allah (awj). All the other texts in this regard are either unauthentic (like the one related by Ibn Hibban), or probabilistic (like those that use the singular or plural forms for "eye").

Jazakum Allahu khayran.

Sharif_Abu_Jafar
01-05-2009, 11:27 AM
Dear respected Shaykh,

Assalamu alaykum. You said:


Can you please explain this a bit further? How is two the opposite of one? In other words, how does negation of being one-eyed necessitate having two eyes? Why not three, four, five or ten?

I understand that having two eyes is the opposite of being one-eyed for human beings, but we cannot assume that for Allah (swt).

So how is this hadith proof for establishing two eyes for Allah (awj)?

Jazak Allahu khayran
I'm no shaykh, but the answer is already given.

But I would like to add something extra, and that is: a'war means the opposite of blindness of two eyes.

So an individual with two eyes which are both blind, is called a'war.
Also, an individual with two eyes wherein one is blind, is called a'war.

Saying Allah is not a'war, is affirming the opposite: being in the possession of two eyes.

That is one of the evidences.

Second:

The hadith of Abu Hurayrah about Allah Seeing everything, therein the Prophet pointed with his vingers to his own two eyes. This is indicative of Allah who a) can see everything, b) with His Eyes and c) which are two in number.

Then there is the Ijma', which has been mentioned before.

wa-Salam